Tag Archive: Austin Energy

Austin Energy Community Solar Survey

Later this year, Austin Energy will begin offering its customers an opportunity to sign up to receive solar energy generated at community solar installations located at the Kingsbery Substation in East Austin, and, in the future, from other solar installations located throughout Austin.  Community solar will allow customers who rent or whose homes cannot be fitted with their own solar panels to be able to purchase local solar energy.

Austin Energy is currently considering several options for how to allow residential customers to enroll in its community solar program, including:

  • a capacity-based subscription with an upfront fee and monthly production credits (Austin Energy estimates investment would pay back in 13 years, with $90/month in savings for 12 more years);
  • a capacity-based subscription with a monthly fee and monthly production credits (Austin Energy estimates the average customer would save $6/month);
  • a fixed community solar fee that would replace the power supply adjustment (PSA) fee (this would initially be more expensive, but could be cheaper in later years);
  • a community solar fee that would be added to the PSA (similar to GreenChoice, where customers forever pay more);
  • a customer ownership model, where customers would buy a number of panels upfront and receive monthly production credits (Austin Energy estimates investment would pay back in 15 years, with $90/month in savings for 10 more years); and
  • a low-income community solar offering subsidized through customer charges.

We encourage you to take Austin Energy’s survey, which the utility will use to help determine the most appropriate model to ensure the success of the community solar program.

Please note that you may have to enable pop-ups and if you see a note that asks for a Login ID and Password, just ignore that and click “Begin Survey.”

The survey will close on June 1st, so don’t wait!

Austin City Council Canidate Forums Offer Chance to See Who Supports Solar

Solar had a big win at the Austin City Council last week.

The Council passed a resolution that doubles the local solar goal to 200 megawatts and the residential and commercial solar goal to 100 megawatts by 2020. The resolution also said that Austin Energy should replace power from the old polluting Decker gas plant with 600 megawatts of large scale solar by 2017.

Sun in fistBut it will be up to the new City Council to make sure these ambitious new goals are implemented.

There are so many candidates running in many of the districts that it might seem difficult to learn what they all think about solar. That’s why Solar Austin is co-hosting a series of candidate forums on Austin Energy issues.

Please join us for your district candidate forum and the mayoral candidate forum.

  • Districts 6 & 10: September 12, 6 – 9 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 8001 Mesa Dr, Austin, TX 78731
  • Districts 2 & 3: September 19, 6 – 9 p.m., Austin JATC Electrical Training Center, 4000 Caven Rd, Austin, TX 78744
  • Districts 1 & 7: September 20, 12:30 – 3:30 p.m., Northwest Recreation Center, 2913 Northland Dr, Austin, TX 78757
  • Districts 4 & 9: September 22, 6 – 9 p.m., First Unitarian Universalist Church, 4700 Grover Ave, Austin, TX 78756
  • Districts 5 & 8: September 23, 6 – 9 p.m., Treehouse, 4477 S. Lamar Blvd, #600, Austin, TX 78745
  • Mayoral: September 29, 7 – 10 p.m., First Unitarian Universalist Church, 4700 Grover Ave, Austin, TX 78756

Please click on the links and share the Facebook events with your friends, neighbors and co-workers.

Candidates will answer questions on a variety of energy topics including solar, climate change and keeping electric bills affordable for low-income customers.

If you don’t know which district you are in, you can look it up. Type in only your street address. For example, if you live at 1234 Barton Springs Rd, Apt 44, type in only “1409 Barton Springs Rd.”

The best way to make sure the next Austin City Council is supportive of solar is for solar supporters to have a presence at these events and learn which candidates will be most likely to keep solar growing in Austin.

Solar Austin Happy Hour: Austin Energy Resource, Generation, and Climate Protection Plan to 2020

You are cordially invited to join the Austin solar community for a discussion on the Austin Energy Resource, Generation, and Climate Protection Plan to 2020.

This event will welcome Matt Johnson who will share insights and perspective into the development and adoption of the Austin Energy Resource, Generation, and Climate Protection Plan to 2020 in 2010, including points on revising resource acquisition and management strategies in light of up to date market and environmental realities.

We will also welcome representatives to the Happy Hour stage to offer an environmental community perspective on this issue and describe the city’s 2 year generation plan update process.

Matt JMatthew Johnson is a Sr. Account Executive at the clean technology communications and consulting firm Mercom Capital Group. Prior to Mercom, Matt worked for Public Citizen’s Texas Office and the D.C.-based Environmental and Energy Study Institute. In 2009, he was selected to represent consumer interests on the Austin Generation Resource Planning Task Force, and organized the Clean Energy for Austin Coalition, which supported city council passing the Resource and Climate Protection Plan in 2010. He holds an MA in Sustainable Development from the SIT Graduate Institute and a BA in History from Augustana College.

When/Where: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM (CST)/Scholz Garten, 1607 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, TX 78701 State Parking Garages can be found next to, behind and across from Scholz Garten. San Jacinto Blvd., 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, and Trinity have parking garage entrances.

 RSVP (desired but not required)

Solar Austin Happy Hour: Pat Sweeney, Jan 22nd

Mr. Pat Sweeney, Director of Energy & Market Operations for Austin Energy, will join us this January to mark the two year anniversary of operation of the 30MW Webberville PV power plant. What have we learned by integrating that facility into the city’s portfolio of power production? How are near zero marginal cost energy sources best deployed into the ERCOT wholesale market? What operational highs and lows have occurred? Join us to hear all about how Webberville, which remains the single largest PV power facility in TX (380 acres, over 127K panels), is serving Austin and what lessons are being applied to recent and future utility scale solar RFPs from the city.

RSVP HERE


Where: Scholz Garten, 1607 San Jacinto, Austin, TX 78701

When: Wednesday, January 22nd, 5:30 – 8:00 p.m.

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Austin Energy Cutting Solar Credits

Is Austin Energy joining the war on solar?

Bit by bit, our publicly owned, nationally renowned, supposedly green electric utility is trying to roll back programs that support customer owned solar.

Austin Energy is cutting the value of solar tariff, which compensates solar owners for the energy they produce, by 16 percent on January 1.

A lower solar tariff means fewer people will choose to purchase solar panels, which means our environment and local economy will suffer.

Tell the Austin City Council to stand up for clean energy and pass a resolution delaying reduction of the solar tariff.

Cutting the solar tariff isn’t the only attack under way. On January 1, Austin Energy will also confiscate all solar credits. Customers earned those credits by providing energy that the utility took and sold. Now Austin Energy is planning to take those credits away.

And just this week, the utility cut solar rebates for the second time this year. These cuts were reportedly made to keep the program from running out of funds, but Austin Energy could have asked for more funding for the solar rebate budget.

The Austin City Council governs Austin Energy, so it’s up to it to keep the utility honest.

Demand a resolution delaying the solar tariff change until after the public has had a chance to give input.

While other utilities are fighting to keep customers from generating their own electricity, Austin Energy should not play that game.

Austin Energy’s solar programs have given it and our city great publicity and helped to build a growing solar economy in the Austin area. Let’s not lose that momentum.

Our utility needs to start listening to us – the people who own it.

Send the Austin City Council an email right now.

Please note that emails will be sent using a Public Citizen action page. You can remove yourself from their list at any time.

We only have a few days to stop this attack before the City Council takes its winter break. Please help by sharing this post with friends, family and neighbors in the Austin area. If you work for a solar company, please forward this email to your customers.